Curator from Atlanta’s High Museum of Art to talk about photography of the civil rights movement at AU museum

Julian Cox,   curator of photography at Atlanta’s High Museum of Art

AUBURN – Julian Cox, curator of photography at Atlanta’s High Museum of Art, will present “Bearing Witness: Photography and the Civil Rights Movement, 1956-1968” on Tuesday, Feb. 5, at 4 p.m. at Auburn University’s Jule Collins Smith Museum. His lecture is the first in the series “New Perspectives: Alabama Art in the Open” focusing on art created for, in or about the out-of-doors.

Cox will base his discussion on research for “Road to Freedom,” an exhibition opening this summer at the High Museum. He will also discuss the role of photography in media culture during the 1960s.

Cox is the author of several books and articles on photography, including the definitive “Julia Margaret Cameron: The Complete Photographs.” He was a curator at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles before his appointment to the High Museum in 2005. He has also worked at the National Museum of Photography, Film & Television in Bradford, England and the National Museum of Wales, Aberystwyth.

Cox received a master’s degree in the history of photography from the University College of Wales, Aberystwyth in 1990 and a bachelor’s degree in art history from the University of Manchester, England in 1987.

The “New Perspectives” series will continue on Feb. 19, with a lecture by Judith McWillie of the University of Georgia titled “Doing Things Right: Traditional Signs in African American Cemeteries, Homes and Churches.”

“New Perspectives: Alabama Art in the Open” is sponsored by the Caroline Marshall Draughon Center for the Arts and Humanities in AU’s College of Liberal Arts and the Alabama Humanities Foundation, a state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. It is cosponsored by the Jule Collins Smith Museum of Fine Art, the AU Art Department and the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at Auburn University.

After premiering at Auburn, the “New Perspectives: Alabama Art in the Open” lectures will be offered in selected locations around the state. For information, call the Caroline Marshall Draughon Center for the Arts and Humanities at (334) 844-4946 or go to http://media.cla.auburn.edu/cah/ .

Contact: Betsy Panhorst, (334) 844-4946 (panhoec@auburn.edu), or
Mike Clardy, (334) 844-9999 (clardch@auburn.edu)