America’s ‘Greatest Historian’ David McCullough to speak at Auburn


David McCullough
AUBURN UNIVERSITY – David McCullough, acclaimed writer and historian, will discuss the critical role of history in education, life and citizenship, particularly for young people, in a free, public lecture at Auburn University on Tuesday, Oct. 15, at 11 a.m. in Auburn Arena.

McCullough, a 2006 winner of the Presidential Medal of Freedom and recipient of two Pulitzer Prizes and two National Book Awards, has been called the master of American history and a “matchless writer.” His books, 10 to date, range from biographies of Harry Truman and John Adams to histories of the Johnstown flood, the Panama Canal and the Brooklyn Bridge. His “1776,” which covers a year in the life of George Washington and the American Revolution, is a classic.

McCullough is also one of America’s most recognizable voices. As the host of PBS’s “American Experience” for more than a decade, he told the stories of history in a riveting, accessible fashion for viewers of all ages and backgrounds. He has lent his voice to several Ken Burns documentaries and narrated the 2003 film “Seabiscuit.”

“We are delighted to host Mr. McCullough at Auburn,” said Associate Provost for Undergraduate Studies Constance Relihan. “Our faculty share his love of history and his belief in its significance in education and in life, especially for young people. Knowledge and appreciation of history is exactly what we strive to nurture in our students.”

McCullough lectures widely, often as a champion of learning history. “We have to know who we were if we’re to know who we are and where we’re headed,” he has written. “This is essential.”

McCullough received his first Pulitzer in 1993 for “Truman,” a biography of the 33rd president. His second Pulitzer was awarded for “John Adams,” published in 2001 and one of the most praised and widely read American biographies of all time. “Truman” and “John Adams” are the basis of an HBO film and series, respectively. The New York Times best-seller “The Greater Journey: Americans in Paris” is McCullough’s most recent book.

McCullough’s talk is made possible by the support of Merchant Capital LLC of Montgomery and is sponsored by the Auburn University Office of the Provost and Office of Undergraduate Studies, in partnership with the Littleton-Franklin Lectures.

Ample seating is available at the Auburn Arena. Public parking for the event is available on the fourth level of the stadium parking deck located at Heisman and Duncan drives. For information, contact Jay Lamar at lamarja@auburn.edu or (334) 844-8453.

Jay Lamar, Office of Undergraduate Studies, (334) 844-8453 (lamarja@auburn.edu),
Mike Clardy, Office of Communications and Marketing, (334) 844-9999 (clardch@auburn.edu)