Two-day symposium on Creek War and War of 1812 to be held at Jule Collins Smith Museum

AUBURN – The Creek War and the War of 1812 will be the subject of a two-day public symposium May 22-23 at the Jule Collins Smith Museum of Fine Art at Auburn University. Scholars from around the country will talk about how these events changed the course of Creek Indian and American history.

“The gathering will celebrate the upcoming 50th anniversary of the establishment of Horseshoe Bend National Military Park in Daviston and launch a commemoration of the seminal conflict that took place at this site,” said Kathryn Braund, a professor of history at Auburn and an expert on Creek Indian history. “In addition, participants will examine new research on the Creek War and the War of 1812.”

The Caroline Marshall Draughon Center for the Arts and Humanities in Auburn’s College of Liberal Arts and Horseshoe Bend National Military Park are co-sponsors of the symposium. It is funded in part by the National Park Service.

Speakers will represent Western Carolina University, the University of Michigan, the U.S. Air Force Academy, the Creek Council House Museum, Horseshoe Bend National Military Park, the Tennessee State Library and Archives, Fort Toulouse and Fort Jackson, the Poarch Band of Creek Indians, Auburn University, Auburn University Montgomery, the University of South Alabama and independent scholars.

Horseshoe Bend National Military Park, located 30 miles from Auburn, is one of four War of 1812 parks in the National Park System. It is the site of an 1814 battle in which General Andrew Jackson led an army of 3,300 to defeat 1,000 Upper Creek warriors. As a result of the battle, the Creeks ceded some 20 million acres of land to the United States.

The Creek War broke out against the backdrop of the American-British War of 1812. For more information on the Creek War, go to http://www.encyclopediaofalabama.org/face/Article.jsp?id=h-1820. For more information on the Battle of Horseshoe Bend, go to http://www.encyclopediaofalabama.org/face/Article.jsp?id=h-1820. Both Web sites are located in the recently launched Encyclopedia of Alabama.

The Caroline Marshall Draughon Center for the Arts and Humanities is the dedicated outreach office for the Auburn University College of Liberal Arts. Founded in 1985, its mission is to strengthen the bonds between the academic community and the general public through arts and humanities initiatives in schools, towns and communities around the state.

Registration for the conference is $25 for one day, $40 for both days and includes lunch and refreshments. For the registration form, the schedule and a list of presenters, go to www.auburn.edu/creekwar or call (334) 844-4948.

Contact: Maiben Beard, (334) 844-4946 (meb0015@auburn.edu), or
Mike Clardy, (334) 844-9999 (clardch@auburn.edu)