Category Archives: Community

Auburn’s Food Bank Garden feeds the community

Zack OglesAUBURN UNIVERSITY — Near the hustle and bustle of a university campus, eight rows of produce grow unnoticed for the sole purpose of feeding the residents of the community.

The Food Bank Garden, a short drive from the center of Auburn University’s campus, is a garden flourishing with vegetables, all to be donated to the Food Bank of East Alabama. This spring and summer is the first time in some years that the garden is back in operation, helping those in Lee County and surrounding counties.

“The Food Bank Garden was created to help out the community,” said Beth Guertal, professor of agronomy in the College of Agriculture, who started the garden in 2006. “I wanted to provide the local food bank with healthy and fresh vegetables to give to their customers.”

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Auburn Athletics partners with Hunger Solutions Institute in End Child Hunger campaign

AUBURN UNIVERSITY – The Auburn University Athletics Department goes on the offense against hunger. Through a partnership with the End Child Hunger in Alabama (ECHA) campaign, spearheaded by Auburn’s Hunger Solutions Institute, Auburn Athletics is embracing hunger as its priority initiative.

Athletics Director Jay Jacobs joined ECHA spokesperson Lt. Gov. Kay Ivey and pro-golfer Jason Dufner to announce the new partnership Friday during a visit to a summer feeding site at the Boys and Girls Club in Auburn.

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Alabama 4-H receives initial $400,000 yearly gift for Centennial Youth Initiative

4H Foundation Trustee Check PresentationAUBURN UNIVERSITY – Alabama 4-H has been transforming young people’s lives for more than a century. Through a generous investment by the Alabama 4-H Club Foundation, Alabama 4-H will reach more youth with improved programming through its Centennial Youth Initiative.

The Alabama 4-H Club Foundation will give $400,000 annually to support CYI and the expansion of 4-H within the state. Established in 1956, the foundation supports statewide 4-H youth education programs delivered by the Alabama Cooperative Extension System and generates private funds to meet youth educational needs.

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City and university collaboration to bring improvements to downtown Auburn

AUBURN UNIVERSITY – The City of Auburn and Auburn University are working together to implement elements of the city’s upcoming Downtown Master Plan and several other downtown-related projects, as part of the one-year, grant-assisted Urban Sustainability Accelerator program of Portland State University.

Throughout the year, city and university officials will coordinate with experts affiliated with the program on downtown alleyway improvements, the intersection of Samford Avenue and College Street, parking improvements, pedestrian safety enhancements along South College Street downtown, rain gardens and a feasibility study of the daylighting of local streams. Other projects may emerge during the course of the year.

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Auburn’s golden eagle Tiger, War Eagle VI, dies June 18 at age 34

AUBURN UNIVERSITY – Famed golden eagle Tiger, a symbol of the Auburn University spirit for nearly 30 years, died June 18, 2014. At 34, she was believed to be among the oldest golden eagles in captivity.

On Aug. 31, 2000, Tiger, who was also known as War Eagle VI, was the first eagle to fly free in Jordan-Hare Stadium. For seven years, she flew at home football games and was retired following her 2006 flight at the Auburn-Georgia  game.

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Finding family roots topic of OLLI at Auburn Brown Bag Lunch and Learn session June 16

AUBURN UNIVERSITY – For those interested in exploring their family history, the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at Auburn University, OLLI at Auburn, is offering a Brown Bag Lunch and Learn program on genealogy. OLLI member and Auburn alumnus Richard Robinson will lead the program.

The session is June 16 from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Clarion Inn & Suites, 1577 S. College St. No registration is required for the summer sessions. Visitors are welcome and participants can bring a lunch.

Robinson said many people become interested in their ancestors as they get older and wish they had paid more attention to the stories about their families that they heard as children. Some want to know whether they are descended from nobility, some want to find out their family’s medical history and still others just want to know where they came from. Robinson said his talk is designed to help newcomers find starting points for their search.

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