Tag Archives: jule collins museum

Museum’s A Little Lunch Music to feature member of Auburn faculty on guitar

AUBURN UNIVERSITY – The Jule Collins Smith Museum of Fine Art at Auburn University will host a free concert by guitarist and Auburn faculty member Daniel Mackowski on Thursday, June 28, from noon to 1 p.m. With this concert, A Little Lunch Music ends for the summer and will begin again in the fall.

Mackowski is an associate professor of mechanical engineering in Auburn’s Samuel Ginn College of Engineering. He has been a part of the local jazz scene since coming to Auburn in 1990 and was a member of the Auburn Knights Orchestra in the 2000s.

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Lyric soprano, Alabama native to perform at Jule Collins Smith Museum March 29

AUBURN – The Jule Collins Smith Museum of Fine Art at Auburn University will host lyric soprano and Alabama native Christina Burroughs, with pianist Nicole Agostin, Thursday, March 29, from noon to 1 p.m. The free public performance is part of the museum’s weekly series, A Little Lunch Music.

With few exceptions, the pieces in the program will have a familiar theme.

“Pretty much, it’s about some stage of love: the newness of love, the tenderness of love and the devastation after loss of love,” said Burroughs.

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Jule Collins Smith Museum to screen independent film showcasing Southern struggles

AUBURN – The Jule Collins Smith Museum of Fine Art is presenting the next film in the 2011-2012 Southern Circuit Tour of Independent Filmmakers. “Welcome to Shelbyville,” directed and produced by Kim A. Snyder, will be screened Tuesday, Nov. 8, at 6 p.m.

“Welcome to Shelbyville” is a glimpse of America at a crossroads. In this one small town in the heart of America’s Bible Belt, a community grapples with rapidly changing demographics. Just a stone’s throw away from Pulaski, Tenn., the birthplace of the Ku Klux Klan, longtime black and white residents are challenged with how best to integrate with a growing Latino population and the more recent arrival of hundreds of Muslim Somali refugees.

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Hargreaves lecture Feb. 19 at Jule Collins Smith Museum to complement photography exhibition

AUBURN – In conjunction with an exhibition of 19th century photographs, Roger Hargreaves will give a talk on “The Social Context of 19th Century Portrait Photography,” Thursday, Feb. 19, at 5 p.m., in the auditorium of Auburn University’s Jule Collins Smith Museum of Fine Art.

The museum galleries will be open until 8 p.m. as part of the museum’s Third Thursday Free Night. A reception and a wine tasting by Gus’s Fine Wine and Beer will follow the program.

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Jule Collins Smith Museum offers membership in 1072 Society to support permanent collection

AUBURN – The Jule Collins Smith Museum of Fine Art at Auburn University is offering an opportunity, through membership in the 1072 Society, for patrons to help shape the future of the museum’s permanent collection.

With their contributions of $1,072, members of the 1072 Society will do more than promote the growth of the collection. They will also build on efforts begun 60 years ago, with the purchase of thirty-six works of original art at a price of $1,072, to establish an art museum in the Auburn community. Those works, the “Advancing American Art” collection, were installed in the Jule Collins Smith Museum when it opened in 2003 as part of the museum’s permanent collection.

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Jule Collins Smith Museum hosting Southern Circuit Tour of Independent Filmmakers

AUBURN – As one of only ten venues in five states to host the 2008-09 Southern Circuit Tour of Independent Filmmakers, Auburn University’s Jule Collins Smith Museum of Fine Art will screen “Member of the Club” on Feb. 17 at 7:30 p.m. After the screening, the film’s director, Phoebe Ferguson, will lead an audience discussion about the film and her work as a filmmaker.

“Member of the Club” tells the story of a debutante, Marisa Arianne Mitchell, who has been groomed from infancy to be a New Orleans Mardi Gras queen. With an observational, cinema verité approach, the film follows the Mitchell family through the 2003-04 debutante season as the debutante experiences a flurry of interviews, dress fittings, rehearsals, academic challenges and ball practices. The film explores black social clubs in the South, as well as issues of race, class and the powerful desire of an American family to belong.

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