Tag Archives: raptor

Auburn’s ‘Football, Fans and Feathers’ kicks off Sept. 2 for 2011 football season

AUBURN – The Southeastern Raptor Center will again host its annual birds-in-flight raptor programs on Fridays before Auburn University home football games. “Football, Fans and Feathers” kicks off Sept. 2 at 4 p.m. in the 350-seat Edgar B. Carter Educational Amphitheater on Raptor Road off Shug Jordan Parkway.

During “Football, Fans and Feathers,” visitors learn about the residents of the Southeastern Raptor Center. Hawks, falcons and eagles will be free-flown from flight towers allowing guests to see these raptors flying close.

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Annual Woofstock celebration to feature raptor release

AUBURN – The Southeastern Raptor Center will release hawks on Saturday, Aug. 27, at Woofstock, an annual celebration for people and dogs sponsored by the Lee County Humane Society at Auburn’s Kiesel Park from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. A short presentation by raptor center staff begins at 9:40 a.m. followed by the release of hawks into the wild.

“We will most likely release broad-winged hawks,” said raptor rehabilitation specialist Liz Crandall. “We will also bring our educational red-tailed hawks and two black vultures.”

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Raptors to be released at Storybook Farm in Opelika Aug. 20

AUBURN – The Southeastern Raptor Center will release raptors into the wild Saturday, Aug. 20, at 9 a.m. at Storybook Farm, 300 Cusseta Rd. in Opelika. The release is open to the public.

“We will release kites or hawks,” said raptor rehabilitation specialist Liz Crandall. “We will also bring our educational red-tailed hawks and two black vultures.”

All birds used in programs are permanent residents that are non-releasable due to prior injuries or human imprinting. The Southeastern Raptor Center is part of the Auburn University College of Veterinary Medicine. The center’s mission is to rehabilitate injured or orphaned raptors and to educate the public. Annually the center takes in between 200 and 275 birds of prey from across the Southeast.

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Auburn’s ‘Football, Fans and Feathers’ kicks off Sept. 3 for 2010 football season

AUBURN – The Southeastern Raptor Center will again host its annual birds-in-flight raptor programs on Fridays before Auburn University home football games. “Football, Fans and Feathers” kicks off Sept. 3 at 4 p.m. in the 350-seat Edgar B. Carter Educational Amphitheater on Raptor Road off Shug Jordan Parkway.

During “Football, Fans and Feathers,” visitors learn about the residents of the Southeastern Raptor Center. Hawks, falcons and eagles will be free-flown from flight towers allowing guests to see these raptors flying close.

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Auburn’s raptor center kicks off ‘Football, Fans and Feathers’ on Sept. 4

AUBURN – Auburn University’s Southeastern Raptor Center will host educational, birds-in-flight raptor programs this fall on Fridays before home football games.

The program, “Football, Fans and Feathers,” begins Sept. 4 at 4 p.m., the day prior to Auburn’s home football opener against Louisiana Tech. A variety of birds such as hawks, falcons and eagles will be free-flown from flight towers. Education specialists will inform the audience about each bird and their role in nature.

Shows will also be held Sept. 11, 18 and 25; Oct. 16 and 30; and Nov 6, each beginning at 4 p.m. The Nov. 27 show will begin at 9 a.m. on the day of the Alabama game.

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Southeastern Raptor Center at AU to release bald eagle Sept. 6 in Dodge County, Ga.

AUBURN – The Southeastern Raptor Center, part of Auburn University’s College of Veterinary Medicine, will release a bald eagle back into the wild around 9 a.m. (EDT) on Saturday, Sept. 6, at the Dodge County public fishing area near Eastman, Ga. The public is invited to view the release.

In early June, local residents in Chester, Ga. discovered the bird huddled between two dumpsters. They notified Shannon Morrison, a licensed veterinary technician with Ocmulgee Veterinary Clinic in Eastman, who picked up the bird and transported it to the clinic. After consulting with a wildlife rehabilitator in Georgia, Morrison identified the bird as an immature bald eagle.

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